Intevac
INTEVAC INC (Form: 10-Q, Received: 05/05/2015 16:13:24)
Table of Contents

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, DC 20549

 

 

FORM 10-Q

 

 

(MARK ONE)

x QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the quarterly period ended April 4, 2015

OR

 

¨ TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from                      to                     

Commission file number 0-26946

 

 

INTEVAC, INC.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

 

 

Delaware   94-3125814

(State or other jurisdiction of

incorporation or organization)

 

(IRS Employer

Identification No.)

3560 Bassett Street

Santa Clara, California 95054

(Address of principal executive office, including Zip Code)

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (408) 986-9888

 

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.     x   Yes     ¨   No

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).     x   Yes     ¨   No

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):

 

Large accelerated filer   ¨    Accelerated filer   x
Non-accelerated filer   ¨ (Do not check if a smaller reporting company)    Smaller reporting company   ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act).     ¨   Yes     x   No

On May 1, 2015, 22,832,388 shares of the Registrant’s Common Stock, $0.001 par value, were outstanding.

 

 

 


Table of Contents

INTEVAC, INC.

INDEX

 

No.

       Page  
  PART I. FINANCIAL INFORMATION   

Item 1.

  Financial Statements (unaudited)   
  Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets      3   
  Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations      4   
  Condensed Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income (Loss)      5   
  Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows      6   
  Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements      7   
Item 2.  

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

     22   

Item 3.

 

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

     29   

Item 4.

  Controls and Procedures      29   
  PART II. OTHER INFORMATION   

Item 1.

  Legal Proceedings      30   

Item 1A.

  Risk Factors      31   

Item 2.

  Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds      38   

Item 3.

  Defaults Upon Senior Securities      38   

Item 4.

  Mine Safety Disclosures      38   

Item 5.

  Other Information      38   

Item 6.

  Exhibits      39   

SIGNATURES

     40   

 

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Table of Contents

PART I. FINANCIAL INFORMATION

 

Item 1. Financial Statements

INTEVAC, INC.

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

 

     April 4,
2015
    January 3,
2015
 
     (Unaudited)  
    

(In thousands, except

par value)

 
ASSETS     

Current assets:

    

Cash and cash equivalents

   $ 17,068      $ 21,482   

Short-term investments

     33,266        29,598   

Trade and other accounts receivable, net of allowances of $0 at both April 4, 2015 and at January 3, 2015

     11,561        12,087   

Inventories

     18,966        19,212   

Prepaid expenses and other current assets

     1,836        1,727   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total current assets

  82,697      84,106   

Property, plant and equipment, net

  12,784      12,826   

Long-term investments

  11,189      17,542   

Restricted cash

  1,780      1,780   

Intangible assets, net of amortization of $4,634 at April 4, 2015 and $4,421 at January 3, 2015

  3,753      3,966   

Deferred income taxes and other long-term assets

  99      55   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total assets

$ 112,302    $ 120,275   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 
LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

Current liabilities:

Accounts payable

$ 4,767    $ 4,640   

Accrued payroll and related liabilities

  2,849      3,977   

Other accrued liabilities

  5,137      8,277   

Customer advances

  2,365      2,551   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total current liabilities

  15,118      19,445   

Other long-term liabilities

  2,285      2,200   

Stockholders’ equity:

Common stock, $0.001 par value

  23      23   

Additional paid-in capital

  163,391      161,271   

Treasury stock, 1,870 shares at April 4, 2015 and 1,426 shares at January 3, 2015

  (12,976   (9,989

Accumulated other comprehensive income

  648      619   

Accumulated deficit

  (56,187   (53,294
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total stockholders’ equity

  94,899      98,630   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity

$ 112,302    $ 120,275   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Note: Amounts as of January 3, 2015 are derived from the January 3, 2015 audited consolidated financial statements.

See accompanying notes.

 

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INTEVAC, INC.

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

 

     Three months ended  
     April 4,
2015
    March 29,
2014
 
     (Unaudited)  
     (In thousands, except per
share amounts)
 

Net revenues:

    

Systems and components

   $ 18,082      $ 13,320   

Technology development

     1,803        3,695   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total net revenues

  19,885      17,015   

Cost of net revenues:

Systems and components

  11,585      9,736   

Technology development

  1,378      2,469   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total cost of net revenues

  12,963      12,205   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Gross profit

  6,922      4,810   

Operating expenses:

Research and development

  4,608      4,273   

Selling, general and administrative

  5,253      5,261   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total operating expenses

  9,861      9,534   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Loss from operations

  (2,939   (4,724

Interest income and other, net

  79      73   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Loss before income taxes

  (2,860   (4,651

Provision for (benefit from) income taxes

  33      (130
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net loss

$ (2,893 $ (4,521
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net loss per share:

Basic and Diluted

$ (0.12 $ (0.19

Weighted average common shares outstanding:

Basic and Diluted

  23,229      23,858   

See accompanying notes.

 

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INTEVAC, INC.

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME (LOSS)

 

     Three months ended  
     April 4,
2015
    March 29,
2014
 
     (Unaudited)  
     (In thousands)  

Net loss

   $ (2,893   $ (4,521
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Other comprehensive income (loss), before tax:

Change in unrealized net gain on available-for-sale investments

  29      5   

Foreign currency translation losses

  —        (31
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Other comprehensive income (loss), before tax

  29      (26
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Income tax provision related to items in other comprehensive loss

  —        —     
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Other comprehensive income (loss), net of tax

  29      (26
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Comprehensive loss

$ (2,864 $ (4,547
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

See accompanying notes.

 

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INTEVAC, INC.

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

 

     Three Months Ended  
     April 4,
2015
    March 29,
2014
 
     (Unaudited)  
     (In thousands)  

Operating activities

    

Net loss

   $ (2,893   $ (4,521

Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash and cash equivalents used in operating activities:

    

Depreciation and amortization

     1,173        1,190   

Net amortization of investment premiums and discounts

     131        208   

Equity-based compensation

     862        697   

Change in the fair value of acquisition-related contingent consideration

     (26     51   

Deferred income taxes

     —          (163

Changes in operating assets and liabilities

     (1,295     (1,909
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total adjustments

  845      74   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net cash and cash equivalents used in operating activities

  (2,048   (4,447

Investing activities

Purchases of investments

  (11,476   (2,996

Proceeds from sales and maturities of investments

  12,000      16,230   

Purchases of leasehold improvements and equipment

  (918   (1,401
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net cash and cash equivalents provided by (used in) investing activities

  (394   11,833   

Financing activities

Proceeds from issuance of common stock

  834      1,000   

Common stock repurchases

  (2,806   (1,140
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net cash and cash equivalents used in financing activities

  (1,972   (140
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Effect of exchange rate changes on cash and cash equivalents

  —        (30
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents

  (4,414   7,216   

Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period

  21,482      20,121   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents at end of period

$ 17,068    $ 27,337   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

See accompanying notes.

 

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INTEVAC, INC.

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(Unaudited)

 

1. Basis of Presentation

In the opinion of management, the unaudited interim condensed consolidated financial statements of Intevac, Inc. and its subsidiaries (Intevac or the Company) included herein have been prepared on a basis consistent with the January 3, 2015 audited consolidated financial statements and include all material adjustments, consisting of normal recurring adjustments, necessary to fairly present the information set forth therein. These unaudited interim condensed consolidated financial statements should be read in conjunction with the audited consolidated financial statements and notes thereto included in Intevac’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended January 3, 2015 (“2014 Form 10-K”). Intevac’s results of operations for the three months ended April 4, 2015 are not necessarily indicative of future operating results.

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America requires management to make judgments, estimates and assumptions that affect the amounts reported in the financial statements and accompanying notes. Actual results could differ materially from those estimates.

 

2. Recent Accounting Pronouncements

In February 2015, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) No. 2015-02, “Consolidations (Topic 810): Amendments to the Consolidation Analysis”, which amends current consolidation guidance including changes to both the variable and voting interest models used by companies to evaluate whether an entity should be consolidated. The amendments in this ASU will be effective for Intevac in the first quarter of fiscal 2016, with early adoption permitted. The adoption of this ASU will not have any effect on our financial position, results of operations or cash flows.

In January 2015, the FASB issued ASU No. 2015-01, “Income Statement – Extraordinary and Unusual Items (Subtopic 225-20),” which simplifies income statement presentation by eliminating the concept of extraordinary items. This ASU will be effective for Intevac in the first quarter of fiscal 2016, with early adoption permitted provided that the guidance is applied from the beginning of the fiscal year of adoption. The adoption of this ASU will not have any effect on our financial position, results of operations or cash flows.

 

3. Inventories

Inventories are stated at the lower of average cost or market and consist of the following:

 

     April 4,
2015
     January 3,
2015
 
     (In thousands)  

Raw materials

   $ 10,864       $ 10,684   

Work-in-progress

     2,541         2,299   

Finished goods

     5,561         6,229   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 
$ 18,966    $ 19,212   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Finished goods inventory consists primarily of completed systems at customer sites that are undergoing installation and acceptance testing and evaluation inventory.

 

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INTEVAC, INC.

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)

(Unaudited)

 

4. Equity-Based Compensation

At April 4, 2015, Intevac had equity-based awards outstanding under the 2012 Equity Incentive Plan and the 2004 Equity Incentive Plan (the “Plans”) and the 2003 Employee Stock Purchase Plan (the “ESPP”). Intevac’s stockholders approved all of these plans. The Plans permit the grant of incentive or non-statutory stock options, restricted stock, stock appreciation rights, restricted stock units (“RSUs” also referred to as “performance units”) and performance shares.

The ESPP provides that eligible employees may purchase Intevac’s common stock through payroll deductions at a price equal to 85% of the lower of the fair market value at the beginning of the applicable offering period or at the end of each applicable purchase interval. Offering periods are generally two years in length, and consist of a series of six-month purchase intervals. Eligible employees may join the ESPP at the beginning of any six-month purchase interval. Under the terms of the ESPP, employees can choose to have up to 15% of their base earnings withheld to purchase Intevac common stock.

Compensation Expense

The effect of recording equity-based compensation for the three-month periods ended April 4, 2015 and March 29, 2014 was as follows:

 

     Three Months Ended  
     April 4, 2015      March 29, 2014  
     (In thousands)  

Equity-based compensation by type of award:

     

Stock options

   $ 316       $ 241   

RSUs

     340         292   

Employee stock purchase plan

     206         164   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total equity-based compensation

$ 862    $ 697   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Equity-based compensation expense is based on awards ultimately expected to vest and such amount has been reduced for estimated forfeitures. Forfeitures were estimated based on Intevac’s historical experience, which Intevac believes to be indicative of Intevac’s future experience.

Stock Options and ESPP

The fair value of stock options and ESPP awards is estimated at the grant date using the Black-Scholes option valuation model. The determination of fair value of stock options and ESPP awards on the date of grant using an option-pricing model is affected by Intevac’s stock price as well as assumptions regarding a number of highly complex and subjective variables. These variables include, but are not limited to, our expected stock price volatility over the term of the awards, and actual employee stock option exercise behavior.

 

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INTEVAC, INC.

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)

(Unaudited)

 

Option activity as of April 4, 2015 and changes during the three months ended April 4, 2015 were as follows:

 

     Shares      Weighted Average
Exercise Price
 

Options outstanding at January 3, 2015

     2,584,935       $ 8.26   

Options granted

     15,375       $ 6.74   

Options cancelled and forfeited

     (237,151    $ 7.34   

Options exercised

     (21,708    $ 4.26   
  

 

 

    

Options outstanding at April 4, 2015

  2,341,451    $ 8.38   
  

 

 

    

Vested and expected to vest at April 4, 2015

  2,209,644    $ 8.48   

Options exercisable at April 4, 2015

  1,318,925    $ 9.67   

Intevac issued 201,000 shares under the ESPP during the three months ended April 4, 2015.

Intevac estimated the weighted-average fair value of stock options and employee stock purchase rights using the following weighted-average assumptions:

 

     Three Months Ended  
     April 4, 2015     March 29, 2014  

Stock Options:

    

Weighted-average fair value of grants per share

   $ 2.60      $ 4.14   

Expected volatility

     49.62     54.71

Risk free interest rate

     1.00     1.87

Expected term of options (in years)

     4.0        5.2   

Dividend yield

     None        None   

Stock Purchase Rights:

    

Weighted-average fair value of grants per share

   $ 2.26      $ 2.15   

Expected volatility

     44.05     43.40

Risk free interest rate

     0.39     0.11

Expected term of purchase rights (in years)

     1.22        0.74   

Dividend yield

     None        None   

The computation of the expected volatility assumptions used in the Black-Scholes calculations for new stock option grants and purchase rights is based on the historical volatility of Intevac’s stock price, measured over a period equal to the expected term of the stock option grant or purchase right. The risk-free interest rate is based on the yield available on U.S. Treasury Strips with an equivalent remaining term. The expected term of employee stock options represents the weighted-average period that the stock options are expected to remain outstanding and was determined based on historical experience of similar awards, giving consideration to the contractual terms of the equity-based awards and vesting schedules. The expected term of purchase rights represents the period of time remaining in the current offering period. The dividend yield assumption is based on Intevac’s history of not paying dividends and the assumption of not paying dividends in the future.

 

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Table of Contents

INTEVAC, INC.

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)

(Unaudited)

 

RSUs

A summary of the RSU activity is as follows:

 

     Shares      Weighted Average
Grant Date
Fair Value
 

Non-vested RSUs at January 3, 2015

     350,429       $ 6.62   

Granted

     144,860       $ 6.84   

Vested

     (2,689    $ 7.94   

Cancelled and forfeited

     (22,073    $ 6.29   
  

 

 

    

Non-vested RSUs at April 4, 2015

  470,527    $ 6.70   
  

 

 

    

RSUs are converted into shares of Intevac common stock upon vesting on a one-for-one basis. RSUs typically are scheduled to vest over four years. Vesting of RSUs is subject to the grantee’s continued service with Intevac. The compensation expense related to these awards is determined using the fair market value of Intevac common stock on the date of the grant, and the compensation expense is recognized over the vesting period. In fiscal 2015 and fiscal 2014, the annual bonus for certain participants in the Company’s annual incentive plan will be settled with RSUs with one year vesting. The Company accrued for the payment of bonuses at the expected company-wide payout percentage amount at April 4, 2015 and March 29, 2014, which amounts were less than the target bonus amounts for each participant. The bonus accrual is classified as a liability until the number of shares is determined on the date the awards are granted, at which time the Company classifies the awards into equity. In February 2015, the annual bonus for certain participants was settled with RSUs with one year vesting, 29 participants were granted stock awards to receive 133,000 shares of common stock with a weighted average grant date fair value of $6.85 per share. The Company recorded equity-based compensation expense related to the annual incentive plans of $(51,000) and $161,000 for the three months ended April 4, 2015 and March 29, 2014, respectively.

Performance-based RSUs (“performance-based awards”) granted in fiscal 2013 to certain executive officers are also subject to the achievement of specified performance goals. These performance-based awards become eligible to vest only if performance goals are achieved and then actually will vest only if the grantee remains employed by Intevac through each applicable vesting date. The fair value of these performance-based awards is estimated on the date of grant and assumes that the specified performance goals will be achieved. If the goals are achieved, these awards vest over a specified remaining service period, provided that the grantee remains employed by Intevac through each scheduled vesting date. If the performance goals are not met, no compensation expense is recognized and any previously recognized compensation expense is reversed. The expected cost of each award is reflected over the service period and is reduced for estimated forfeitures. For performance-based awards granted during fiscal 2013, the performance goals require the achievement of targeted revenues and adjusted annual operating profit levels measured at the end of two and three-year periods. In early 2015, the Compensation Committee assessed performance against the goals following the completion of the 2-year performance period for Tranche 1 and determined that 5,532 shares of the awards became earned and therefore eligible for time-based vesting.

 

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INTEVAC, INC.

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)

(Unaudited)

 

5. Purchased Intangible Assets

Details of finite-lived intangible assets by segment as of April 4, 2015, are as follows.

 

     April 4, 2015  
     Gross
Carrying
Amount
     Accumulated
Amortization
     Net
Carrying
Amount
 
     (In thousands)  

Thin-film Equipment

   $ 7,172       $ (3,822    $ 3,350   

Photonics

     1,215         (812      403   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
$ 8,387    $ (4,634 $ 3,753   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total amortization expense of finite-lived intangibles for the three months ended April 4, 2015 was $213,000.

As of April 4, 2015, future amortization expense is expected to be as follows.

 

(In thousands)       

2015

   $ 640   

2016

     853   

2017

     756   

2018

     615   

2019

     615   

Thereafter

     274   
  

 

 

 
$ 3,753   
  

 

 

 

 

6. Acquisition-Related Contingent Consideration

In connection with the acquisition of Solar Implant Technologies, Inc. (“SIT”), Intevac agreed to pay to the selling shareholders in cash a revenue earnout on Intevac’s net revenue from commercial sales of certain products over a specified period up to an aggregate of $9.0 million. Intevac estimated the fair value of this contingent consideration on April 4, 2015 based on probability-based forecasted revenues reflecting Intevac’s own assumptions concerning future revenue from such products. As of April 4, 2015, payments made associated with the revenue earnout obligation have not been significant.

The fair value measurement of contingent consideration is based on significant inputs not observed in the market and thus represents a Level 3 measurement. Any change in fair value of the contingent consideration subsequent to the acquisition date is recognized in operating income within the statement of operations. The following table represents a reconciliation of the change in the fair value measurement of the contingent consideration liability for the three-month periods ended April 4, 2015 and March 29, 2014:

 

     Three Months Ended  
     April 4,
2015
     March 29,
2014
 
     (In thousands)  

Opening balance

   $ 1,134       $ 1,384   

Changes in fair value

     (26      51   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Closing balance

$ 1,108    $ 1,435   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

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INTEVAC, INC.

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)

(Unaudited)

 

The following table displays the balance sheet classification of the contingent consideration liability account at April 4, 2015 and at January 3, 2015:

 

     April 4,      January 3,  
     2015      2015  
     (In thousands)  

Other accrued liabilities

   $ 32       $ 59   

Other long-term liabilities

     1,076         1,075   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total acquisition-related contingent consideration

$ 1,108    $ 1,134   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

The following table represents the quantitative range of the significant unobservable inputs used in the calculation of fair value of the continent consideration liability as of April 4, 2015. Significant increases or decreases in any of these inputs in isolation would result in a significantly lower (higher) fair value measurement.

 

     Quantitative Information about Level 3 Fair Value Measurements at April 4, 2015
     Fair Value     

Valuation Technique

  

Unobservable Input

   Range (Weighted Average)
     (In thousands, except for percentages)

Revenue Earnout

   $ 1,108       Discounted cash flow   

Weighted average cost of capital

Probability weighting of achieving revenue forecasts

   15.6%

 

20.0% - 80.0% (45.3%)

 

7. Warranty

Intevac provides for the estimated cost of warranty when revenue is recognized. Intevac’s warranty is per contract terms and for its disk manufacturing, PV manufacturing and display cover panel manufacturing systems the warranty typically ranges between 12 and 24 months from customer acceptance. For systems sold through a distributor, Intevac offers a 3 month warranty. The remainder of any warranty period is the responsibility of the distributor. During this warranty period any defective non-consumable parts are replaced and installed at no charge to the customer. The warranty period on consumable parts is limited to their reasonable usable lives. Intevac uses estimated repair or replacement costs along with its historical warranty experience to determine its warranty obligation. Intevac generally provides a twelve month warranty on its Photonics’ products. The provision for the estimated future costs of warranty is based upon historical cost and product performance experience. Intevac exercises judgment in determining the underlying estimates.

On the condensed consolidated balance sheets, the short-term portion of the warranty provision is included in other accrued liabilities, while the long-term portion is included in other long-term liabilities. The expense associated with product warranties issued or adjusted is included in cost of net revenues on the condensed consolidated statements of operations.

 

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INTEVAC, INC.

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)

(Unaudited)

 

The following table displays the activity in the warranty provision account for the three-month periods ended April 4, 2015 and March 29, 2014:

 

     Three Months Ended  
     April 4,
2015
     March 29,
2014
 
     (In thousands)  

Opening balance

   $ 1,186       $ 1,647   

Expenditures incurred under warranties

     (130      (305

Accruals for product warranties issued during the reporting period

     396         284   

Adjustments to previously existing warranty accruals

     (100      (295
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Closing balance

$ 1,352    $ 1,331   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

The following table displays the balance sheet classification of the warranty provision account at April 4, 2015 and at January 3, 2015:

 

     April 4,      January 3,  
     2015      2015  
     (In thousands)  

Other accrued liabilities

   $ 1,111       $ 1,022   

Other long-term liabilities

     241         164   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total warranty provision

$ 1,352    $ 1,186   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

8. Guarantees

Officer and Director Indemnifications

As permitted or required under Delaware law and to the maximum extent allowable under that law, Intevac has certain obligations to indemnify its current and former officers and directors for certain events or occurrences while the officer or director is, or was serving, at Intevac’s request in such capacity. These indemnification obligations are valid as long as the director or officer acted in good faith and in a manner the person reasonably believed to be in or not opposed to the best interests of the Company and, with respect to any criminal action or proceeding, had no reasonable cause to believe his or her conduct was unlawful. The maximum potential amount of future payments Intevac could be required to make under these indemnification obligations is unlimited; however, Intevac has a director and officer insurance policy that mitigates Intevac’s exposure and enables Intevac to recover a portion of any future amounts paid. As a result of Intevac’s insurance policy coverage, Intevac believes the estimated fair value of these indemnification obligations is not material.

Other Indemnifications

As is customary in Intevac’s industry, many of Intevac’s contracts provide remedies to certain third parties such as defense, settlement, or payment of judgments for intellectual property claims related to the use of its products. Such indemnification obligations may not be subject to maximum loss clauses. Historically, payments made related to these indemnifications have been immaterial.

Letters of Credit

As of April 4, 2015, we had letters of credit and bank guarantees outstanding totaling $1.8 million, including the standby letter of credit outstanding under the Santa Clara, California facility lease and a banker’s guarantee which guarantees customer advances under a customer contract.

 

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INTEVAC, INC.

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)

(Unaudited)

 

9. Cash, Cash Equivalents and Investments

Cash and cash equivalents, short-term investments and long-term investments consist of:

 

     April 4, 2015  
     Amortized
Cost
     Unrealized
Holding
Gains
     Unrealized
Holding
Losses
     Fair Value  
     (In thousands)  

Cash and cash equivalents:

           

Cash

   $ 2,712       $ —         $ —         $ 2,712   

Money market funds

     14,356         —           —           14,356   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total cash and cash equivalents

$ 17,068    $ —      $ —      $ 17,068   

Short-term investments:

Commercial paper

$ 6,991    $ 1    $ —      $ 6,992   

Corporate bonds and medium-term notes

  18,489      8      1      18,496   

Municipal bonds

  2,770      3      —        2,773   

U.S. treasury and agency securities

  4,998      7      —        5,005   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total short-term investments

$ 33,248    $ 19    $ 1    $ 33,266   

Long-term investments:

Corporate bonds and medium-term notes

$ 2,021    $ 2    $ —      $ 2,023   

Municipal bonds

  3,167      1      6      3,162   

U.S. treasury and agency securities

  5,991      13      —        6,004   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total long-term investments

$ 11,179    $ 16    $ 6    $ 11,189   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total cash, cash equivalents, and investments

$ 61,495    $ 35    $ 7    $ 61,523   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

14


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INTEVAC, INC.

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)

(Unaudited)

 

     January 3, 2015  
     Amortized
Cost
     Unrealized
Holding
Gains
     Unrealized
Holding
Losses
     Fair Value  
     (In thousands)  

Cash and cash equivalents:

           

Cash

   $ 4,948       $ —         $ —         $ 4,948   

Money market funds

     16,534         —           —           16,534   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total cash and cash equivalents

$ 21,482    $ —      $ —      $ 21,482   

Short-term investments:

Commercial paper

$ 2,995    $ 2    $ —      $ 2,997   

Corporate bonds and medium-term notes

  21,203      2      6      21,199   

Municipal bonds

  5,392      11      1      5,402   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total short-term investments

$ 29,590    $ 15    $ 7    $ 29,598   

Long-term investments:

Corporate bonds and medium-term notes

$ 6,266    $ 1    $ 4    $ 6,263   

Municipal bonds

  2,290      —        8      2,282   

U.S. treasury and agency securities

  8,995      3      1      8,997   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total long-term investments

$ 17,551    $ 4    $ 13    $ 17,542   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total cash, cash equivalents, and investments

$ 68,623    $ 19    $ 20    $ 68,622   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

The following table provides the fair market value of Intevac’s investments with unrealized losses that are not deemed to be other-than temporarily impaired as of April 4, 2015.

 

     April 4, 2015  
     In Loss Position for
Less than 12 Months
     In Loss Position for
Greater than 12 Months
 
     Fair
Value
     Gross
Unrealized
Losses
     Fair Value      Gross
Unrealized
Losses
 
     (in thousands)  

Corporate bonds and medium-term notes

   $ 8,075       $ 1       $ —         $ —     

Municipal bonds

     2,669         6         —           —     
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
$ 10,744    $ 7    $ —      $ —     
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

The contractual maturities of available-for-sale securities at April 4, 2015 are presented in the following table.

 

     Amortized
Cost
     Fair Value  
     (In thousands)  

Due in one year or less

   $ 47,604       $ 47,622   

Due after one through two years

     11,179         11,189   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 
$ 58,783    $ 58,811   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

All prices for the fixed maturity securities including U.S. Treasury and agency securities, commercial paper, corporate bonds and municipal bonds are received from independent pricing services utilized by Intevac’s outside investment manager. This investment manager performs a review of the pricing methodologies and inputs utilized by the independent pricing services for each asset type priced by the vendor. In addition, on at least an annual basis, the investment manager conducts due diligence visits and interviews with each pricing vendor to verify the inputs

 

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INTEVAC, INC.

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)

(Unaudited)

 

utilized for each asset class. The due diligence visits include a review of the procedures performed by each vendor to ensure that pricing evaluations are representative of the price that would be received to sell a security in an orderly transaction. Any pricing where the input is based solely on a broker price is deemed to be a Level 3 price. Intevac uses the pricing data obtained from its outside investment manager as the primary input to make its assessments and determinations as to the ultimate valuation of the above-mentioned securities and has not made, during the periods presented, any material adjustments to such inputs.

The following table represents the fair value hierarchy of Intevac’s available-for-sale securities measured at fair value on a recurring basis as of April 4, 2015.

 

     Fair Value
Measurements
at April 4, 2015
 
     Total      Level 1      Level 2  
     (In thousands)  

Recurring fair value measurements:

        

Available-for-sale securities

        

Money market funds

   $ 14,356       $ 14,356       $ —     

U.S. treasury and agency securities

     11,009         9,008         2,001   

Commercial paper

     6,992         —           6,992   

Corporate bonds and medium-term notes

     20,519         —           20,519   

Municipal bonds

     5,935         —           5,935   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total recurring fair value measurements

$ 58,811    $ 23,364    $ 35,447   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

10. Derivative Instruments

The Company uses foreign currency forward contracts to mitigate variability in gains and losses generated from the re-measurement of certain monetary assets and liabilities denominated in foreign currencies and to offset certain operational exposures from the impact of changes in foreign currency exchange rates. These derivatives are carried at fair value with changes recorded in interest income and other, net in the consolidated statements of operations. Changes in the fair value of these derivatives are largely offset by re-measurement of the underlying assets and liabilities. Cash flows from such derivatives are classified as operating activities. The derivatives have original maturities of approximately 30, 60, 210 and 240 days.

The following table summarizes the Company’s outstanding derivative instruments on a gross basis as recorded in its condensed consolidated balance sheets as of April 4, 2015 and January 3, 2015:

 

     Notional Amounts      Derivative Assets      Derivative Liabilities  

Derivative Instrument

   April 4,
2015
     January 3,
2015
     April 4,
2015
     January 3,
2015
     April 4,
2015
     January 3,
2015
 
                   Balance
Sheet
Line
    Fair
Value
     Balance
Sheet
Line
    Fair
Value
     Balance
Sheet
Line
    Fair
Value
     Balance
Sheet
Line
    Fair
Value
 
     (in thousands)  

Undesignated Hedges:

                         

Forward Foreign Currency Contracts

   $ 1,520       $ 2,647         (a )   $ 16         (a )   $ 10         (b   $ 3         (b   $ 4   
  

 

 

    

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

 

Total Hedges

$ 1,520    $ 2,647    $ 16    $ 10    $ 3    $ 4   
  

 

 

    

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

 

 

(a) Prepaid expenses and other current assets
(b) Other accrued liabilities

 

16


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INTEVAC, INC.

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)

(Unaudited)

 

11. Equity

Stock Repurchase Program

On November 21, 2013, Intevac’s Board of Directors approved a stock repurchase program authorizing up to $30.0 million in repurchases. At April 4, 2015, $17.0 million remains available for future stock repurchases under the repurchase program.

The following table summarizes Intevac’s stock repurchases:

 

     Three Months Ended  
     April 4, 2015      March 29, 2014  
     (In thousands, except per share amounts)  

Shares of common stock repurchased

     443         138   

Cost of stock repurchased

   $ 2,987       $ 1,050   

Average price paid per share

   $ 6.71       $ 7.63   

Intevac records treasury stock purchases under the cost method using the first-in, first-out (FIFO) method. Upon reissuance of treasury stock, amounts in excess of the acquisition cost are credited to additional paid in capital. If Intevac reissues treasury stock at an amount below its acquisition cost and additional paid in capital associated with prior treasury stock transactions is insufficient to cover the difference between the acquisition cost and the reissue price, this difference is recorded against retained earnings.

Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income

The changes in accumulated other comprehensive income by component for the three months ended April 4, 2015 and March 29, 2014, are as follows.

 

     Three Months Ended      Three Months Ended  
     April 4, 2015      March 29, 2014  
     Foreign
currency
     Unrealized
holding gains
on available-
for-sale
investments
    Total      Foreign
currency
    Unrealized
holding gains
on available-
for-sale
investments
     Total  
     (In thousands)  

Beginning balance

   $ 620       $ (1   $ 619       $ 691      $ 34       $ 725   

Other comprehensive income
(loss) before reclassification

     —           29        29         (31     5         (26

Amounts reclassified from other
comprehensive income

     —           —          —           —          —           —     
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Net current-period other comprehensive income (loss)

  —        29      29      (31   5      (26
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Ending balance

$ 620    $ 28    $ 648    $ 660    $ 39    $ 699   
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

17


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INTEVAC, INC.

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)

(Unaudited)

 

12. Net Loss Per Share

The following table sets forth the computation of basic and diluted loss per share:

 

     Three Months Ended  
     April 4,
2015
     March 29,
2014
 
     (In thousands)  

Net loss

   $ (2,893    $ (4,521
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Weighted-average shares – basic

  23,229      23,858   

Effect of dilutive potential common shares

  —        —     
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Weighted-average shares – diluted

  23,229      23,858   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Net loss per share – basic

$ (0.12 $ (0.19
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Net loss per share – diluted

$ (0.12 $ (0.19
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Antidilutive shares based on employee awards excluded

  2,178      1,844   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Potentially dilutive common shares consist of shares issuable upon exercise of employee stock options and vesting of RSUs and are excluded from the calculation of diluted EPS when their effect would be anti-dilutive.

 

13. Segment Reporting

Intevac’s two reportable segments are: Thin-film Equipment and Photonics. Effective in the first quarter of 2015, Intevac renamed the Equipment segment Thin-film Equipment. Intevac’s chief operating decision-maker has been identified as the President and CEO, who reviews operating results to make decisions about allocating resources and assessing performance for the entire Company. Segment information is presented based upon Intevac’s management organization structure as of April 4, 2015 and the distinctive nature of each segment. Future changes to this internal financial structure may result in changes to the reportable segments disclosed.

Each reportable segment is separately managed and has separate financial results that are reviewed by Intevac’s chief operating decision-maker. Each reportable segment contains closely related products that are unique to the particular segment. Segment operating profit is determined based upon internal performance measures used by the chief operating decision-maker.

Intevac derives the segment results from its internal management reporting system. The accounting policies Intevac uses to derive reportable segment results are substantially the same as those used for external reporting purposes. Management measures the performance of each reportable segment based upon several metrics, including orders, net revenues and operating income. Management uses these results to evaluate the performance of, and to assign resources to, each of the reportable segments. Intevac manages certain operating expenses separately at the corporate level. Intevac allocates certain of these corporate expenses to the segments in an amount equal to 3% of net revenues. Segment operating income excludes interest income/expense and other financial charges and income taxes according to how a particular reportable segment’s management is measured. Management does not consider impairment charges, gains and losses on divestitures and sales of intellectual property, and unallocated costs in measuring the performance of the reportable segments.

The Thin-film Equipment segment designs, develops and markets vacuum process equipment solutions for high-volume manufacturing of small substrates with precise thin-film properties for hard drive, solar cell and cell phone manufacturers as well as other adjacent thin-film deposition applications.

 

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Table of Contents

INTEVAC, INC.

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)

(Unaudited)

 

The Photonics segment develops compact, cost-effective, high-sensitivity digital-optical products for the capture and display of low-light images and the optical analysis of materials. Intevac provides sensors, cameras and systems for government applications such as night vision and long-range target identification.

Information for each reportable segment for the three months ended April 4, 2015 and March 29, 2014 is as follows:

Net Revenues

 

     Three Months Ended  
     April 4,
2015
     March 29,
2014
 
     (In thousands)  

Thin-film Equipment

   $ 10,628       $ 9,047   

Photonics

     9,257         7,968   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total segment net revenues

$ 19,885    $ 17,015   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Operating Loss

 

     Three Months Ended  
     April 4,
2015
     March 29,
2014
 
     (In thousands)  

Thin-film Equipment

   $ (3,297    $ (4,141

Photonics

     1,477         908   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total segment operating profit (loss)

  (1,820   (3,233

Unallocated costs

  (1,119   (1,491
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Loss from operations

  (2,939   (4,724

Interest income and other, net

  79      73   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Loss before income taxes

$ (2,860 $ (4,651
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total assets for each reportable segment as of April 4, 2015 and January 3, 2015 are as follows:

Assets

 

     April 4,
2015
     January 3,
2015
 
     (In thousands)  

Thin-film Equipment

   $ 29,647       $ 30,670   

Photonics

     17,260         17,126   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total segment assets

  46,907      47,796   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Cash, cash equivalents and investments

  61,523      68,622   

Restricted cash

  1,780      1,780   

Deferred income taxes

  52      5   

Other current assets

  840      989   

Common property, plant and equipment

  1,200      1,083   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Consolidated total assets

$ 112,302    $ 120,275   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

19


Table of Contents

INTEVAC, INC.

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)

(Unaudited)

 

14. Restructuring Charges

During the first quarter of fiscal 2015, Intevac substantially completed implementation of the 2015 cost reduction plan (the “Plan”), which was intended to reduce expenses and reduce its workforce by 3 percent. The cost of implementing the Plan was reported under cost of net revenues and operating expenses in the condensed consolidated statements of operations. Substantially all cash outlays in connection with the Plan occurred in the first quarter of fiscal 2015. Implementation of the Plan is expected to reduce salary, wages and other employee-related expenses by approximately $1.4 million on an annual basis.

During the first half of fiscal 2014, Intevac substantially completed implementation of the 2014 cost reduction plan (the “2014 Plan”), which was intended to reduce expenses and reduce its workforce by 6 percent. The cost of implementing the 2014 Plan was reported under cost of net revenues and operating expenses in the condensed consolidated statements of operations. Substantially all cash outlays in connection with the Plan occurred in the first half of fiscal 2014. Implementation of the 2014 Plan is expected to reduce salary, wages and other employee-related expenses by approximately $2.1 million on an annual basis. As of April 4, 2015, activities related to the 2014 Plan were complete.

The changes in restructuring reserves associated with the Plans for the three months ended April 4, 2015 and March 29, 2014 are as follows:

 

     Three Months Ended  
     April 4,      March 29,  
     2015      2014  
     Severance and
other
employee-
related costs
     Severance and
other
employee-
related costs
 
     (In thousands)  

Beginning balance

   $ —         $ —     

Provision for restructuring reserves

     148         227   

Cash payments made

     (148      (227
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Ending balance

$ —      $ —     
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

15. Income Taxes

Intevac recorded an income tax provision of $33,000 for the three months ended April 4, 2015 and an income tax benefit of $130,000 for the three months ended March 29, 2014. The income tax provisions for the three month periods are based upon estimates of annual income (loss), annual permanent differences and statutory tax rates in the various jurisdictions in which Intevac operates. Intevac did not recognize a benefit on the U.S. net operating loss for the three month periods ended April 4, 2015 and March 29, 2014 due to having full valuation allowances on the U.S. deferred tax assets. Intevac did not recognize a benefit on the Singapore net operating loss for the three months ended April 4, 2015 due to having full valuation allowances on the Singapore deferred tax assets. Intevac’s tax rate differs from the applicable statutory rates due primarily to establishment of a valuation allowance, the utilization of deferred and current credits and the effect of permanent differences and adjustments of prior permanent differences. Intevac’s future effective income tax rate depends on various factors including, the level of Intevac’s projected earnings, the geographic composition of worldwide earnings, tax regulations governing each region, net operating loss carryforwards, availability of tax credits and the effectiveness of Intevac’s tax planning strategies. Management carefully monitors these factors and timely adjusts the effective income tax rate.

 

20


Table of Contents

INTEVAC, INC.

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)

(Unaudited)

 

16. Commitments and Contingencies

From time to time, Intevac may have certain contingent liabilities that arise in the ordinary course of its business activities. Intevac accounts for contingent liabilities when it is probable that future expenditures will be made and such expenditures can be reasonably estimated.

 

21


Table of Contents
Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

This Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q contains forward-looking statements, which involve risks and uncertainties. Words such as “believes,” “expects,” “anticipates” and the like indicate forward-looking statements. These forward-looking statements include comments related to Intevac’s shipments, projected revenue recognition, product costs, gross margin, operating expenses, interest income, income taxes, cash balances and financial results in 2015 and beyond; projected customer requirements for Intevac’s new and existing products, and when, and if, Intevac’s customers will place orders for these products; Intevac’s ability to proliferate its Photonics technology into major military programs and to develop and introduce commercial imaging products; the timing of delivery and/or acceptance of the systems and products that comprise Intevac’s backlog for revenue and the Company’s ability to achieve cost savings. Intevac’s actual results may differ materially from the results discussed in the forward-looking statements for a variety of reasons, including those set forth under “Risk Factors” and in other documents we file from time to time with the Securities and Exchange Commission, including our Annual Report on Form 10-K filed on February 17, 2015, and our periodic Form 10-Q’s and Form 8-K’s.

Overview

Intevac provides process manufacturing equipment solutions to the hard disk drive industry and offers high-productivity, thin-film processing systems to the PV industry and to adjacent markets for thin-film deposition applications including the display cover panel market. Intevac also provides sensors, cameras and systems for government applications such as night vision and long-range target identification. Intevac’s customers include manufacturers of hard disk drives, PV cells and cell phones as well as the U.S. government and its agencies and contractors. Intevac reports two segments: Thin-film Equipment and Photonics. Effective in the first quarter of 2015, Intevac renamed the Equipment segment Thin-film Equipment.

Product development and manufacturing activities occur in North America and Asia. Intevac has field offices in Asia to support its equipment customers. Intevac’s equipment and service products are highly technical and are sold primarily through Intevac’s direct sales force. Intevac also sells its products through distributors in Japan and China.

Intevac’s results are driven by worldwide demand for hard disk drives, which in turn depends on the growth in digital data creation and storage, the rate of areal density improvements, the end-user demand for personal computers, enterprise data storage, including on-line, cloud storage and near-line applications, personal audio and video players and video game platforms that include such drives. Demand for Intevac’s equipment is impacted by Intevac’s customers’ relative market share positions and production capacity needs. Intevac continues to execute its strategy of equipment diversification into new markets by introducing new products for PV solar cell manufacturing and most recently a thin-film PVD application for protective coating for display cover panel manufacturing. Intevac believes that expansion into these markets will result in incremental equipment revenues for Intevac and decrease Intevac’s dependence on the hard disk drive industry. Intevac’s equipment business is subject to cyclical industry conditions, as demand for manufacturing equipment and services can change depending on supply and demand for hard disk drives, PV cells, and cell phones as well as other factors such as global economic conditions and technological advances in fabrication processes.

The following table presents certain significant measurements for the three months ended April 4, 2015 and March 29, 2014:

 

     Three Months Ended  
     April 4,
2015
    March 29,
2014
    Change over
prior period
 
     (In thousands, except percentages and
per share amounts)
 

Net revenues

   $ 19,885      $ 17,015      $ 2,870   

Gross profit

   $ 6,922      $ 4,810      $ 2,112   

Gross margin percent

     34.8     28.3     7 points   

Net loss

   $ (2,893   $ (4,521   $ 1,628   

Loss per diluted share

   $ (0.12   $ (0.19   $ 0.07   

 

22


Table of Contents

Net revenues increased during the first quarter of fiscal 2015 compared to the same period in the prior year primarily due to higher equipment sales and higher Photonics product sales, offset in part by lower Photonics technology development contracts. Thin-film Equipment recognized revenue on one 200 Lean system in both the first quarter of fiscal 2015 and fiscal 2014. Thin-film Equipment also recognized revenue on the first VERTEX™ coating system for display cover panels in the first quarter of fiscal 2015.The net loss for the first quarter of fiscal 2015 decreased compared to the same period in the prior year due to higher revenues and improved gross margins offset in part by slightly higher operating expenses as the Company made incremental investments in research and development (“R&D”).

In fiscal 2015, although Intevac expects positive growth for media unit shipments, Intevac expects that our hard disk drive customers’ media production capacity will continue to exceed demand and the company therefore expects that shipments of Intevac equipment to hard disk drive manufacturers will be approximately at the same levels as 2014. In 2015, Intevac expects higher sales of new thin-film equipment products as Intevac delivers the initial production shipments of our coating system for display cover panels and as solar cell manufacturers begin to adopt new vacuum technologies in the manufacturing of solar cells. For fiscal 2015, Intevac expects that Photonics business levels will be about the same levels as 2014 as Photonics continues to deliver production shipments of the pilot night vision systems for the Apache helicopter.

Intevac’s trademarks, include the following: “200 Lean ® ,” “AccuLuber™,” “EBAPS ® ,” “ENERG i ™,” “I-Port™,” “LithoPrime™,” “LIVAR ® ,” “INTEVAC MATRIX™,” “MicroVista ® ,” “NightVista ® ,” “Night Port™” and “INTEVAC VERTEX™”.

Results of Operations

Net revenues

 

     Three Months Ended  
     April 4,
2015
     March 29,
2014
     Change over
prior period
 
     (In thousands)  

Thin-film Equipment

   $ 10,628       $ 9,047       $ 1,581   

Photonics

        

Products

     7,454         4,273         3,181   

Contract R&D

     1,803         3,695         (1,892
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
  9,257      7,968      1,289   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total net revenues

$ 19,885    $ 17,015    $ 2,870   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Thin-film Equipment revenue for both the three months ended April 4, 2015 and March 29, 2014 included revenue recognized for one 200 Lean system, disk equipment technology upgrades and spare parts. Thin-film Equipment revenue for the three months ended April 4, 2015 included the first VERTEX coating system for display cover panels. Thin-film Equipment revenue for both the three months ended April 4, 2015 and March 29, 2014 did not include any sales of solar tools.

Photonics revenue for the three months ended April 4, 2015 increased over the same period in the prior year as a result of increased product sales offset in part by lower contract R&D work. The increase in product sales resulted from the ramp in production deliveries for the Apache pilot night viewing camera during 2014.

 

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Backlog

 

     April 4,
2015
     January 3,
2015
     March 29,
2014
 
     (In thousands)  

Thin-film Equipment

   $ 16,156       $ 17,743       $ 8,451   

Photonics

     23,011         30,683         43,398   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total backlog

$ 39,167    $ 48,426    $ 51,849   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Thin-film Equipment backlog at April 4, 2015 included one PV deposition system and one PV implant system. Thin-film Equipment backlog at January 3, 2015 included one 200 Lean system, one PV deposition system, one PVD coating system for display cover panels and one PV implant system. Thin-film Equipment backlog at March 29, 2014 included one PV deposition system and one PVD coating system for display cover panels.

Revenue by geographic region

 

     Three Months Ended  
     April 4,
2015
     March 29,
2014
     Change over
prior period
 
     (In thousands)  

United States

   $ 16,614       $ 14,508       $ 2,106   

Asia

     2,388         1,480         908   

Europe

     883         1,027         (144
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total net revenues

$ 19,885    $ 17,015    $ 2,870   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

International sales include products shipped to overseas operations of U.S. companies. U.S. sales in both 2015 and 2014 included the delivery of a 200 Lean system to a U.S. factory of a U.S. customer. The increase in sales to the U.S. region in 2015 versus 2014 reflected higher sales of pilot night vision cameras for the Apache helicopter and higher camera sales to another U.S. customer. The increase in sales to the Asia region in 2015 versus 2014 was primarily due to the sale of the first VERTEX coating system for display cover panels. The decrease in sales to the Europe region in 2015 versus 2014 was primarily due to lower sales of Photonics’ digital night-vision cameras to a NATO customer.

Gross profit

 

     Three Months Ended  
     April 4,
2015
    March 29,
2014
    Change over
prior period
 
     (In thousands, except percentages)  

Thin-film Equipment gross profit

   $ 3,026      $ 2,006      $ 1,020   

% of Thin-film Equipment net revenues

     28.5     22.2  

Photonics gross profit

   $ 3,896      $ 2,804      $ 1,092   

% of Photonics net revenues

     42.1     35.2  

Total gross profit

   $ 6,922      $ 4,810      $ 2,112   

% of net revenues

     34.8     28.3  

Cost of net revenues consists primarily of purchased materials and costs attributable to contract R&D, and also includes fabrication, assembly, test and installation labor and overhead, customer-specific engineering costs, warranty costs, royalties, provisions for inventory reserves and scrap.

Thin-film Equipment gross margin was 28.5% in the three months ended April 4, 2015 and increased from 22.2% in the three months ended March 29, 2014. The improvement in margins was due to higher factory absorption and lower excess and obsolete inventory charges. Gross margins in the Thin-film Equipment business will vary depending on a number of factors, including revenue levels, product mix, product cost, system configuration and pricing, factory utilization, and provisions for excess and obsolete inventory.

 

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Photonics gross margin was 42.1% in the three months ended April 4, 2015 and increased from 35.2% in the three months ended March 29, 2014 due primarily to a change in product mix to higher-margin product sales.

Research and development

 

     Three Months Ended  
     April 4,
2015
     March 29,
2014
     Change over
prior period
 
     (In thousands)  

Research and development expense

   $ 4,608       $ 4,273       $ 335   

Research and development spending increased in Thin-film Equipment and in Photonics during the three months ended April 4, 2015 as compared to the three months ended March 29, 2014. The increase in Thin-film Equipment spending was due primarily to increased PV development associated with a JDP with a customer, offset in part by cost containment efforts. The increase in Photonics spending was due primarily to lower billable contract R&D efforts. Research and development expenses do not include costs of $1.4 million and $2.5 million for the three-month periods ended April 4, 2015 and March 29, 2014, respectively, which are related to customer-funded contract R&D programs at Photonics and therefore included in cost of net revenues.

Selling, general and administrative

 

     Three Months Ended  
     April 4,
2015
     March 29,
2014
     Change over
prior period
 
     (In thousands)  

Selling, general and administrative expense

   $ 5,253       $ 5,261       $ (8

Selling, general and administrative expense consists primarily of selling, marketing, customer support, financial and management costs. Selling, general and administrative expenses for the three months ended April 4, 2015 were flat compared to the three months ended March 29, 2014. Lower variable compensation program expense and savings from cost reduction initiatives, were offset by increased equity compensation expense. Selling, general and administrative spending in the three months ended March 29, 2014 also included professional service costs associated with a contested Board of Directors election.

Cost reduction plans

During the first quarter of fiscal 2015, Intevac substantially completed implementation of the 2015 cost reduction plan (the “Plan”), which was intended to reduce expenses and reduce its workforce by 3 percent. The total cost of implementing the Plan was $148,000 of which $81,000 was reported under cost of net revenues and $67,000 was reported under operating expenses. Substantially all cash outlays in connection with the Plan occurred in the first quarter of fiscal 2015. Implementation of the Plan is expected to reduce salary, wages and other employee-related expenses by approximately $1.4 million on an annual basis.

During the first quarter of fiscal 2014, Intevac substantially completed implementation of the 2014 cost reduction plan (the “2014 Plan”), which was intended to reduce expenses and reduce its workforce by 5 percent. The total cost of implementing the 2014 Plan was $227,000 of which $43,000 was reported under cost of net revenues and $184,000 was reported under operating expenses. Substantially all cash outlays in connection with the 2014 Plan occurred in the first quarter of fiscal 2014. As of April 4, 2015, activities related to the 2014 Plan were complete.

 

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Interest income and other, net

 

     Three Months Ended  
     April 4,
2015
     March 29,
2014
     Change over
prior period
 
     (In thousands)  

Interest income and other, net

   $ 79       $ 73       $ 6   

Interest income and other, net in the three months ended April 4, 2015 included $53,000 of interest income on investments, various other income of $6,000 and $20,000 of foreign currency gains. Interest income and other, net in the three months ended March 29, 2014 included $47,000 of interest income on investments, various other income of $22,000 and $4,000 of foreign currency gains. The increase in interest income in the three months ended April 4, 2015 resulted from higher interest rates offset in part by lower invested balances.

Income tax benefit

 

     Three Months Ended  
     April 4,
2015
     March 29,
2014
     Change over
prior period
 
     (In thousands)  

Income tax (provision) benefit

   $ (33    $ 130       $ (163

Intevac recorded an income tax provision of $33,000 for the three months ended April 4, 2015 and an income tax benefit of $130,000 for the three months ended March 29, 2014. The income tax provisions for the three month periods are based upon estimates of annual income (loss), annual permanent differences and statutory tax rates in the various jurisdictions in which Intevac operates. Intevac did not recognize a benefit on the U.S. net operating loss for either of the three month periods ended April 4, 2015 and March 29, 2014 due to having full valuation allowances on the U.S. deferred tax assets. Intevac did not recognize a benefit on the Singapore net operating loss for the three months ended April 4, 2015 due to having full valuation allowances on the Singapore deferred tax assets. Intevac’s tax rate differs from the applicable statutory rates due primarily to establishment of a valuation allowance, the utilization of deferred and current credits and the effect of permanent differences and adjustments of prior permanent differences. Intevac’s future effective income tax rate depends on various factors including, the level of Intevac’s projected earnings, the geographic composition of worldwide earnings, tax regulations governing each region, net operating loss carryforwards, availability of tax credits and the effectiveness of Intevac’s tax planning strategies. Management carefully monitors these factors and timely adjusts the effective income tax rate.

Liquidity and Capital Resources

At April 4, 2015, Intevac had $61.5 million in cash, cash equivalents, and investments compared to $68.6 million at January 3, 2015. During the first three months of 2015, cash, cash equivalents and investments decreased by $7.1 million due primarily to cash used by operating activities, repurchases of common stock and purchases of fixed assets partially offset by cash received from the sale of Intevac common stock to Intevac’s employees through Intevac’s employee benefit plans.

 

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Cash, cash equivalents and investments consist of the following:

 

     April 4,
2015
     January 3,
2015
 
     (In thousands)  

Cash and cash equivalents

   $ 17,068       $ 21,482   

Short-term investments

     33,266         29,598   

Long-term investments

     11,189         17,542   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total cash, cash equivalents and investments

$ 61,523    $ 68,622   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Operating activities used cash of $2.0 million during the first three months of 2015 and of $4.4 million during the first three months of 2014. The decrease in cash used by operating activities was due primarily to a smaller net loss, decreases in working capital during the first three months of 2015 and lower bonus payments as fiscal 2014 bonuses were primarily settled in RSUs.

Accounts receivable totaled $11.6 million at April 4, 2015 compared to $12.1 million at January 3, 2015. Net inventories totaled $19.0 million at April 4, 2015 compared to $19.2 million at January 3, 2015. Accounts payable totaled $4.8 million at April 4, 2015 compared to $4.6 million at January 3, 2015. Other accrued liabilities decreased to $5.1 million at April 4, 2015 compared to $8.3 million at January 3, 2015. Other accrued liabilities at January 3, 2015 included $4.3 million of deferred revenue associated with two completed systems at customer sites that were undergoing installation and acceptance testing and an accrual of $2.1 million for unsettled trades for purchases of investments at January 3, 2015. Other accrued liabilities at April 4, 2015 included $2.9 million of deferred revenue associated with a completed system at a customer site that is undergoing installation and acceptance testing. Customer advances decreased from $2.6 million at January 3, 2015 to $2.4 million at April 4, 2015.

Investing activities used cash of $394,000 during the first three months of 2015. Proceeds from sales of investments net of purchases totaled $524,000. Capital expenditures for the three months ended April 4, 2015 were $918,000.

Financing activities in the first three months of 2015 used cash of $2.0 million. The sale of Intevac common stock to Intevac’s employees through Intevac’s employee benefit plans generated cash $834,000. Cash used to repurchase shares of common stock under the Company’s stock repurchase program totaled $2.8 million for the three months ended April 4, 2015.

Intevac’s investment portfolio consists principally of investment grade money market mutual funds, U.S. Treasury and agency securities, commercial paper, municipal bonds and corporate bonds. Intevac regularly monitors the credit risk in its investment portfolio and takes measures, which may include the sale of certain securities, to manage such risks in accordance with its investment policies.

As of April 4, 2015, approximately $6.4 million of cash and cash equivalents and $780,000 of restricted cash were domiciled in foreign tax jurisdictions. Intevac expects a significant portion of these funds to remain off shore in the short term. If the Company chose to repatriate these funds to the United States, it would be required to accrue and pay additional taxes on any portion of the repatriation where no United States income tax had been previously provided.

Intevac believes that its existing cash, cash equivalents and investments will be sufficient to meet its cash requirements for the foreseeable future. Intevac intends to undertake approximately $7.0 million to $8.0 million in capital expenditures during the remainder of 2015.

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

Off-balance sheet firm commitments relating to outstanding letters of credit amounted to approximately $1.8 million as of April 4, 2015. We do not maintain any other off-balance sheet arrangements, transactions, obligations, or other relationships that would be expected to have a material current or future effect on the consolidated financial statements.

 

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Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates

The preparation of financial statements and related disclosures in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“US GAAP”) requires management to make judgments, assumptions and estimates that affect the amounts reported. Intevac’s significant accounting policies are described in Note 1 to the consolidated financial statements included in Item 8 of Intevac’s Annual Report on Form 10-K filed on February 17, 2015. Certain of these significant accounting policies are considered to be critical accounting policies, as defined below.

A critical accounting policy is defined as one that is both material to the presentation of Intevac’s financial statements and requires management to make difficult, subjective or complex judgments that could have a material effect on Intevac’s financial conditions and results of operations. Specifically, critical accounting estimates have the following attributes: 1) Intevac is required to make assumptions about matters that are highly uncertain at the time of the estimate; and 2) different estimates Intevac could reasonably have used, or changes in the estimate that are reasonably likely to occur, would have a material effect on Intevac’s financial condition or results of operations.

Estimates and assumptions about future events and their effects cannot be determined with certainty. Intevac bases its estimates on historical experience and on various other assumptions believed to be applicable and reasonable under the circumstances. These estimates may change as new events occur, as additional information is obtained and as Intevac’s operating environment changes. These changes have historically been minor and have been included in the consolidated financial statements as soon as they become known. In addition, management is periodically faced with uncertainties, the outcomes of which are not within its control and will not be known for prolonged periods of time. Many of these uncertainties are discussed in the section below entitled “Risk Factors.” Based on a critical assessment of Intevac’s accounting policies and the underlying judgments and uncertainties affecting the application of those policies, management believes that Intevac’s consolidated financial statements are fairly stated in accordance with US GAAP, and provide a meaningful presentation of Intevac’s financial condition and results of operation.

For further information about Intevac’s other critical accounting policies, see the discussion of critical accounting policies in Intevac’s 2014 Form 10-K. Management believes that there has been no significant change during the three months ended April 4, 2015 to the items identified as critical accounting policies in Intevac’s 2014 Form 10-K.

 

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Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

Interest rate risk. Intevac’s exposure to market risk for changes in interest rates relates primarily to its investment portfolio. Intevac does not use derivative financial instruments in Intevac’s investment portfolio. The Company has adopted an investment policy and established guidelines relating to credit quality, diversification and maturities of its investments in order to preserve principal and maintain liquidity. All investment securities in Intevac’s portfolio have an investment grade credit rating. Investments typically consist of commercial paper, obligations of the U.S. government and its agencies, corporate debt securities and municipal bonds.

The table below presents principal amounts and related weighted-average interest rates by year of expected maturity for Intevac’s investment portfolio at April 4, 2015.

 

     2015     2016     2017     Total      Fair
Value
 
     (In thousands, except percentages)  

Cash equivalents

           

Variable rate amounts

   $ 14,356        —          —        $ 14,356       $ 14,356   

Weighted-average rate

     0.06     —          —     

Short-term investments

           

Fixed rate amounts

   $ 19,974      $ 11,271        —        $ 31,245       $ 31,262   

Weighted-average rate

     1.52     1.26     —     

Variable rate amounts

   $ 2,003        —          —        $ 2,003       $ 2,004   

Weighted-average rate

     0.56     —          —     

Long-term investments

           

Fixed rate amounts

     —        $ 8,165      $ 3,014      $ 11,179       $ 11,189   

Weighted-average rate

     —          1.07     0.96     

Total investment portfolio

   $ 36,333      $ 19,436      $ 3,014      $ 58,783       $ 58,811   

Foreign exchange risk. From time to time, Intevac enters into foreign currency forward exchange contracts to hedge certain of its anticipated foreign currency re-measurement exposures and to offset certain operational exposures from the impact of changes in foreign currency exchange rates. The objective of these contracts is to minimize the impact of foreign currency exchange rate movements on Intevac’s operating results. The derivatives have original maturities of approximately 30, 60, 210 and 240 days. The notional amount of Company’s foreign currency derivatives was $1.5 million at April 4, 2015 and $2.6 million at January 3, 2015.

 

Item 4. Controls and Procedures

Evaluation of disclosure controls and procedures

Intevac maintains a set of disclosure controls and procedures that are designed to ensure that information relating to Intevac, Inc. required to be disclosed in periodic filings under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, or Exchange Act, is recorded, processed, summarized and reported in a timely manner under the Exchange Act. In connection with the filing of this Form 10-Q for the quarter ended April 4, 2015, as required under Rule 13a-15(b) of the Exchange Act, an evaluation was carried out under the supervision and with the participation of management, including the Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, of the effectiveness of Intevac’s disclosure controls and procedures as of the end of the period covered by this quarterly report. Based on this evaluation, Intevac’s Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures were effective as of April 4, 2015.

Attached as exhibits to this Quarterly Report are certifications of the CEO and the CFO, which are required in accordance with Rule 13a-14 of the Exchange Act. This Controls and Procedures section includes the information concerning the controls evaluation referred to in the certifications, and it should be read in conjunction with the certifications for a more complete understanding of the topics presented.

 

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Definition of disclosure controls

Disclosure Controls are controls and procedures designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed in our reports filed under the Exchange Act, such as this Quarterly Report, is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the Securities and Exchange Commission’s rules and forms. Disclosure Controls are also designed to ensure that such information is accumulated and communicated to our management, including the CEO and CFO, as appropriate to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure. Our Disclosure Controls include components of our internal control over financial reporting, which consists of control processes designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of our financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles in the U.S. To the extent that components of our internal control over financial reporting are included within our Disclosure Controls, they are included in the scope of our quarterly controls evaluation.

Limitations on the effectiveness of controls

Intevac’s management, including the CEO and CFO, does not expect that Intevac’s Disclosure Controls or Intevac’s internal control over financial reporting will prevent all error and all fraud. A control system, no matter how well designed and operated, can provide only reasonable, not absolute, assurance that the control system’s objectives will be met. Further, the design of a control system must reflect the fact that there are resource constraints, and the benefits of controls must be considered relative to their costs. Because of the inherent limitations in all control systems, no evaluation of controls can provide absolute assurance that all control issues and instances of fraud, if any, within Intevac have been detected. These inherent limitations include the realities that judgments in decision-making can be faulty and that breakdowns can occur because of simple error or mistake. Controls can also be circumvented by the individual acts of some persons, by collusion of two or more people, or by management override of the controls. The design of any system of controls is based in part on certain assumptions about the likelihood of future events, and there can be no assurance that any design will succeed in achieving its stated goals under all potential future conditions. Over time, controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions or deterioration in the degree of compliance with policies or procedures. Because of the inherent limitations in a cost-effective control system, misstatements due to error or fraud may occur and not be detected.

Changes in internal controls over financial reporting

There were no changes in our internal controls over financial reporting that occurred during the period covered by this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, Intevac’s internal control over financial reporting.

PART II. OTHER INFORMATION

 

Item 1. Legal Proceedings

From time to time, Intevac is involved in claims and legal proceedings that arise in the ordinary course of business. Intevac expects that the number and significance of these matters will increase as Intevac’s business expands. Any claims or proceedings against us, whether meritorious or not, could be time consuming, result in costly litigation, require significant amounts of management time, result in the diversion of significant operational resources, or require us to enter into royalty or licensing agreements which, if required, may not be available on terms favorable to us or at all. Intevac is not presently a party to any lawsuit or proceeding that, in Intevac’s opinion, is likely to seriously harm Intevac’s business.

 

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Item 1A. Risk Factors

The following factors could materially affect Intevac’s business, financial condition or results of operations and should be carefully considered in evaluating the Company and its business, in addition to other information presented elsewhere in this report.

The industries we serve are cyclical, volatile and unpredictable.

A significant portion of our revenue is derived from the sale of equipment used to manufacture commodity technology products such as disk drives, PV solar cells and cell phones. This subjects us to business cycles, the timing, length and volatility of which can be difficult to predict. When demand for commodity technology products exceeds production capacity, then demand for new capital equipment such as ours tends to be amplified. Conversely, when supply of commodity technology products exceeds demand, then demand for new capital equipment such as ours tends to be depressed. For example, sales of systems for magnetic disk production were depressed from late 2007 through 2009. The number of new systems delivered increased in 2010 as customers increased their production capacity in response to increased demand for data storage, but decreased in 2011 through 2014 as the hard disk drive industry did not add the same level of capacity that it did in 2010. We cannot predict with any certainty when these cycles will begin or end. We believe that our sales will continue to be depressed through 2015.

Our equipment represents only a portion of the capital expenditure that our customers incur when they upgrade or add production capacity. Accordingly, our customers generally commit to making large capital expenditures far in excess of the cost of our systems alone when they decide to purchase our systems. The magnitude of these capital expenditures requires our customers to have access to large amounts of capital. Our customers generally reduce their level of capital investment during downturns in the overall economy or during a downturn in their industries.

We must effectively manage our resources and production capacity to meet rapidly changing demand. Our business experiences rapid growth and contraction, which stresses our infrastructure, internal systems and managerial resources. During periods of increasing demand for our products, we must have sufficient manufacturing capacity and inventory to meet customer demand; attract, retain and motivate a sufficient number of qualified individuals; and effectively manage our supply chain. During periods of decreasing demand for our products, we must be able to align our cost structure with prevailing market conditions; motivate and retain key employees and effectively manage our supply chain.

Sales of our equipment are primarily dependent on our customers’ upgrade and capacity expansion plans and whether our customers select our equipment.

We have no control over our customers’ upgrade and capacity expansion plans, and we cannot be sure they will select, or continue to select, our equipment when they upgrade or expand their capacity. The sales cycle for our equipment systems can be a year or longer, involving individuals from many different areas of Intevac and numerous product presentations and demonstrations for our prospective customers. Our sales process also commonly includes production of samples and customization of our products. We do not enter into long-term contracts with our customers, and until an order is actually submitted by a customer there is no binding commitment to purchase our systems.

Sales of new manufacturing systems are also dependent on obsolescence and replacement of the installed base of our customers’ existing equipment with newer, more capable equipment. If upgrades are developed that extend the useful life of the installed base of systems, then we tend to sell more upgrade products and fewer new systems, which can significantly reduce total revenue. For example, some of our 200 Lean customers continue to use legacy systems for the production of perpendicular media, which delayed the replacement of such systems with new 200 Lean systems.

Our 200 Lean customers also experience competition from companies that produce alternative storage technologies like flash memory, which offer smaller size, lower power consumption and more rugged designs. These storage technologies are being used increasingly in enterprise applications and smaller form factors such as tablets, smart-phones, ultra-books, and notebook personal computers instead of hard disk drives. Tablet computing

 

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devices and smart-phones have never contained, nor are they likely in the future to contain, a disk drive. Products using alternative technologies, such as flash memory, optical storage and other storage technologies are becoming increasingly common and could become a significant source of competition to particular applications of the products of our 200 Lean customers, which could adversely affect our results of operations. If alternative technologies, such as flash memory, replace hard disk drives as a significant method of digital storage, then demand for our hard disk manufacturing products would decrease.

The Photonics’ business is also subject to long sales cycles because many of its products, such as our military imaging products, often must be designed into the customers’ end products, which are often complex state-of-the-art products. These development cycles are typically multi-year, and our sales are contingent on our customers successfully integrating our product into their product, completing development of their product and then obtaining production orders for their product from the U.S. government or its allies.

We operate in an intensely competitive marketplace, and our competitors have greater resources than we do.

In the market for our disk sputtering systems, we experience competition primarily from Canon Anelva, which has sold a substantial number of systems worldwide. In the PV equipment market, Intevac faces competition from large established competitors including Applied Materials, Centrotherm Photovoltaics, Amtech, Jusung and Von Ardenne. In the market for our military imaging products we experience competition from companies such as Exelis and L-3 Communications. Some of our competitors have substantially greater financial, technical, marketing, manufacturing and other resources than we do, especially in the PV equipment market. Our competitors may develop enhancements to, or future generations of, competitive products that offer superior price or performance features, and new competitors may enter our markets and develop such enhanced products. Moreover, competition for our customers is intense, and our competitors have historically offered substantial pricing concessions and incentives to attract our customers or retain their existing customers.

Our growth depends on development of technically advanced new products and processes.

We have invested heavily, and continue to invest, in the development of new products, such as our 200 Lean and other PVD systems, our solar systems for PV applications, our digital night-vision products and our near-eye display products. Our success in developing and selling new products depends upon a variety of factors, including our ability to: predict future customer requirements, make technological advances, achieve a low total cost of ownership for our products, introduce new products on schedule, manufacture products cost-effectively including transitioning production to volume manufacturing; commercialize and attain customer acceptance of our products; and achieve acceptable and reliable performance of our new products in the field. Our new product decisions and development commitments must anticipate continuously evolving industry requirements significantly in advance of sales. In addition, we are attempting to expand into new or related markets, including the PV and cell phone cover glass markets. Our expansion into the PV market is dependent upon the success of our customers’ development plans. To date we have not recognized material revenue from such products. Failure to correctly assess the size of the markets, to successfully develop cost effective products to address the markets or to establish effective sales and support of the new products would have a material adverse effect on future revenues and profits. In addition, if we invest in products for which the market does not develop as anticipated, we may incur significant charges related to such investments.

Rapid technological change in our served markets requires us to rapidly develop new technically advanced products. Our future success depends in part on our ability to develop and offer new products with improved capabilities and to continue to enhance our existing products. If new products have reliability or quality problems, our performance may be impacted by reduced orders, higher manufacturing costs, delays in acceptance and payment for new products and additional service and warranty expenses.

We are exposed to risks associated with a highly concentrated customer base.

Historically, a significant portion of our revenue in any particular period has been attributable to sales of our disk sputtering systems to a limited number of customers. This concentration of customers, when combined with changes in the customers’ specific capacity plans and market share shifts can lead to extreme variability in our revenue and financial results from period to period.

 

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The concentration of our customer base may enable our customers to demand pricing and other terms unfavorable to Intevac, and makes us more vulnerable to changes in demand by a given customer. Orders from a relatively limited number of manufacturers have accounted for, and will likely continue to account for, a substantial portion of our revenues. The loss of one of these large customers, or delays in purchasing by them, could have a material and adverse effect on our revenues.

Our operating results fluctuate significantly from quarter to quarter, which can lead to volatility in the price of our common stock.

Our quarterly revenues and common stock price have fluctuated significantly. We anticipate that our revenues, operating margins and common stock price will continue to fluctuate for a variety of reasons, including: (1) changes in the demand, due to seasonality, cyclicality and other factors in the markets for computer systems, storage subsystems and consumer electronics containing disks our customers produce with our systems; (2) delays or problems in the introduction and acceptance of our new products, or delivery of existing products; (3) timing of orders, acceptance of new systems by our customers or cancellation of those orders; (4) new products, services or technological innovations by our competitors or us; (5) changes in our manufacturing costs and operating expense; (6) changes in general economic, political, stock market and industry conditions; and (7) any failure of our operating results to meet the expectations of investment research analysts or investors.

Any of these, or other factors, could lead to volatility and/or a rapid change in the trading price of our common shares. In the past, securities class action litigation has been instituted against companies following periods of volatility in the market price of their securities. Any such litigation, if instituted against Intevac, could result in substantial costs and diversion of management time and attention.

Adverse economic conditions and volatility and disruption of the capital and credit markets may negatively impact our revenues and our ability to access financing.

Economic conditions worldwide have contributed to decreased spending by our customers and a slowdown in the hard disk drive industry. These factors have adversely impacted our operating results and have caused us to be cautious about our future outlook. Our customers also continue to remain cautious about the economy. Negative macroeconomic and global recessionary factors, further volatility or disruption in the capital and credit markets or further uncertainty or weakening in key markets could negatively impact spending for our products and may materially adversely affect our business, operating results and financial condition.

In addition, while we intend to finance operations with existing cash and cash flow from operations, if necessary, we may require financing to support our continued operations. Due to the existing uncertainty in the capital and credit markets, our access to capital may not be available on terms acceptable to us or at all.

We may not be able to obtain export licenses from the U.S. government permitting delivery of our products to international customers.

Many of our products, especially Photonics’ products, require export licenses from U.S. government agencies under the Export Administration Act, the Trading with the Enemy Act of 1917, the Arms Export Act of 1976 or the International Traffic in Arms Regulations. These regulations limit the potential market for some of our products. We can give no assurance that we will be successful in obtaining all the licenses necessary to export our products. Heightened government scrutiny of export licenses for defense related products has resulted in lengthened review periods for our license applications. Exports to countries that are not considered by the U.S. government to be allies are likely to be prohibited, and even sales to U.S. allies may be limited. Failure to comply with export control laws, including identification and reporting of all exports and re-exports of controlled technology or exports made without correct license approval or improper license use could result in severe penalties and revocation of licenses. Failure to obtain export licenses, delays in obtaining licenses, or revocation of previously issued licenses would prevent us from selling the affected products outside the United States and could negatively impact our results of operations.

 

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The Photonics business is dependent on U.S. government contracts, which are subject to fixed pricing, immediate termination and a number of procurement rules and regulations.

We sell our Photonics products and services directly to the U.S. government, as well as to prime contractors for various U.S. government programs. The U.S government is considering significant changes in the level of existing, follow-on or replacement programs. We cannot predict the impact of potential changes in priorities due to military transformations and/or the nature of future war-related activities. A shift of government priorities to programs in which we do not participate and/or reductions in funding for or the termination of programs in which we do participate, unless offset by other programs and opportunities, could have a material adverse effect on our financial position, results of operations, or cash flows.

Funding of multi-year government programs is subject to congressional appropriations, and there is no guarantee that the U.S. government will make further appropriations, particularly given the U.S. government’s recent focus on spending in other areas and spending reductions. Sales to the U.S. government and its prime contractors may also be affected by changes in procurement policies, budget considerations and political developments in the United States or abroad. For example, if the U.S. government is less focused on defense spending or there is a decrease in hostilities, demand for our products could decrease. The loss of funding for a government program would result in a loss of future revenues attributable to that program. The influence of any of these factors, which are beyond our control, could negatively impact our results of operations.

A significant portion of our U.S. government revenue is derived from fixed-price development and production contracts. Under fixed-price contracts, unexpected increases in the cost to develop or manufacture a product, whether due to inaccurate estimates in the bidding process, unanticipated increases in material costs, reduced production volumes, inefficiencies or other factors, are borne by us. We have experienced cost overruns in the past that have resulted in losses on certain contracts, and may experience additional cost overruns in the future. We are required to recognize the total estimated impact of cost overruns in the period in which they are first identified. Such cost overruns could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations.

Generally, government contracts contain provisions permitting termination, in whole or in part, without prior notice at the government’s convenience upon the payment of compensation only for work done and commitments made at the time of termination. We cannot ensure that one or more of the government contracts under which we, or our customers, operate will not be terminated under these circumstances. Also, we cannot ensure that we, or our customers, would be able to procure new government contracts to offset the revenues lost as a result of any termination of existing contracts, nor can we ensure that we, or our customers, will continue to remain in good standing as federal contractors.

As a U.S. government contractor we must comply with specific government rules and regulations and are subject to routine audits and investigations by U.S. government agencies. If we fail to comply with these rules and regulations, the results could include: (1) reductions in the value of our contracts; (2) reductions in amounts previously billed and recognized as revenue; (3) contract modifications or termination; (4) the assessment of penalties and fines; and (5) suspension or debarment from government contracting or subcontracting for a period of time or permanently.

Changes to our effective tax rate affect our results of operations.

As a global company, we are subject to taxation in the United States, Singapore and various other countries. Significant judgment is required to determine and estimate worldwide tax liabilities. Our future effective tax rate could be affected by: (1) changes in tax laws; (2) the allocation of earnings to countries with differing tax rates; (3) changes in worldwide projected annual earnings in current and future years: (4) accounting pronouncements; or (5) changes in the valuation of our deferred tax assets and liabilities. Although we believe our tax estimates are reasonable, there can be no assurance that any final determination will not be different from the treatment reflected in our historical income tax provisions and accruals, which could result in additional payments by Intevac.

Beginning in 2007, Intevac benefitted from a tax holiday in Singapore which was scheduled to expire at the end of 2015. The tax holiday provided a lower income tax rate on income from certain technology, so long as certain

 

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thresholds of business investment and employment levels were met in Singapore. Intevac was granted an early termination of this tax holiday effective January 1, 2013 by the Singapore tax authority. The terms of the early termination include meeting certain agreed upon future annual business spending and staffing levels in Singapore. Failure to meet the terms of the early termination could result in a claw back by the Singapore government of tax benefits received in previous years. A claw back of all or part of these tax benefits would adversely affect our results of operations and cash flows.

Our success depends on international sales and the management of global operations.

In previous years, the majority of our revenues have come from regions outside the United States. Most of our international sales are to customers in Asia, which includes products shipped to overseas operations of U.S. companies. We currently have manufacturing facilities in California and Singapore and international customer support offices in Singapore, China, and Malaysia. We expect that international sales will continue to account for a significant portion of our total revenue in future years. Certain of our suppliers are also located outside the United States.

Managing our global operations presents challenges including, but not limited to, those arising from: (1) global trade issues; (2) variations in protection of intellectual property and other legal rights in different countries; (3) concerns of U.S. governmental agencies regarding possible national commercial and/or security issues posed by growing manufacturing business in Asia; (4) fluctuation of interest rates, raw material costs, labor and operating costs, and exchange rates; (5) variations in the ability to develop relationships with suppliers and other local businesses; (6) changes in the laws and regulations of the United States, including export restrictions, and other countries, as well as their interpretation and application; (7) the need to provide technical and spares support in different locations; (8) political and economic instability; (9) cultural differences; (10) varying government incentives to promote development; (11) shipping costs and delays; (12) adverse conditions in credit markets; (13) variations in tariffs, quotas, tax codes and other market barriers; and (14) barriers to movement of cash.

We must regularly assess the size, capability and location of our global infrastructure and make appropriate changes to address these issues.

We may be subject to additional impairment charges due to potential declines in the fair value of our assets.

As a result of our acquisitions, we have significant intangible assets and had significant goodwill on our balance sheet. We test these assets for impairment on a periodic basis as required, and whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying value may not be recoverable. The events or changes that could require us to test our intangible assets for impairment include: a significant reduction in our stock price, and as a result market capitalization, changes in our estimated future cash flows, as well as changes in rates of growth in our industry or in any of our reporting units. In the fourth quarter of 2012, as a result of a decline in our market capitalization and a reduction in our revenue expectations we recorded a goodwill impairment charge in the amount of $18.4 million. We will continue to evaluate the carrying value of our intangible assets and if we determine in the future that there is a potential further impairment, we may be required to record additional charges to earnings which could materially adversely affect our financial results and could also materially adversely affect our business. See Note 5 “Purchased Intangible Assets” in the Notes to the Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information related to impairment of goodwill and intangible assets.

Our success is dependent on recruiting and retaining a highly talented work force.

Our employees are vital to our success, and our key management, engineering and other employees are difficult to replace. We do not maintain key person life insurance on any of our employees. The expansion of high technology companies worldwide has increased demand and competition for qualified personnel, and has made companies increasingly protective of prior employees. It may be difficult for us to locate employees who are not subject to non-competition agreements and other restrictions.

The majority of our U.S. operations are located in California where the cost of living and of recruiting employees is high. Our operating results depend, in large part, upon our ability to retain and attract qualified

 

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management, engineering, marketing, manufacturing, customer support, sales and administrative personnel. Furthermore, we compete with industries such as the hard disk drive, semiconductor, and solar industries for skilled employees. Failure to retain existing key personnel, or to attract, assimilate or retain additional highly qualified employees to meet our needs in the future, could have a material and adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

We are dependent on certain suppliers for parts used in our products.

We are a manufacturing business. Purchased parts constitute the largest component of our product cost. Our ability to manufacture depends on the timely delivery of parts, components and subassemblies from suppliers. We obtain some of the key components and subassemblies used in our products from a single supplier or a limited group of suppliers. If any of our suppliers fail to deliver quality parts on a timely basis, we may experience delays in manufacturing, which could result in delayed product deliveries, increased costs to expedite deliveries or develop alternative suppliers, or require redesign of our products to accommodate alternative suppliers. Some of our suppliers are thinly capitalized and may be vulnerable to failure given recent economic conditions.

Our business depends on the integrity of our intellectual property rights.

The success of our business depends upon the integrity of our intellectual property rights, and we cannot ensure that: (1) any of our pending or future patent applications will be allowed or that any of the allowed applications will be issued as patents or will issue with claims of the scope we sought; (2) any of our patents will not be invalidated, deemed unenforceable, circumvented or challenged; (3) the rights granted under our patents will provide competitive advantages to us; (4) other parties will not develop similar products, duplicate our products or design around our patents; or (5) our patent rights, intellectual property laws or our agreements will adequately protect our intellectual property or competitive position.

From time to time, we have received claims that we are infringing third parties’ intellectual property rights or seeking to invalidate our rights. We cannot ensure that third parties will not in the future claim that we have infringed current or future patents, trademarks or other proprietary rights relating to our products. Any claims, with or without merit, could be time-consuming, result in costly litigation, cause product shipment delays or require us to enter into royalty or licensing agreements. Such royalty or licensing agreements, if required, may not be available on terms acceptable to us.

We could be involved in litigation.

From time to time we may be involved in litigation of various types, including litigation alleging infringement of intellectual property rights and other claims. Litigation is expensive, subjects us to the risk of significant damages and requires significant management time and attention and could have a material and adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Difficulties in integrating past or future acquisitions could adversely affect our business.

We have completed a number of acquisitions and dispositions during our operating history. For example, in 2007, we acquired certain assets of DeltaNu, LLC and certain assets of Creative Display Systems, LLC, in 2008 we acquired certain assets of OC Oerlikon Balzers Ltd., in 2010 we acquired the outstanding shares of SIT, in 2012 we completed the sale of certain semiconductor mainframe technology assets and in 2013 we completed the sale of the assets of DeltaNu. We have spent and may continue to spend significant resources identifying and pursuing future acquisition opportunities. Acquisitions involve numerous risks including: (1) difficulties in integrating the operations, technologies and products of the acquired companies; (2) the diversion of our management’s attention from other business concerns; and (3) the potential loss of key employees of the acquired companies. Failure to achieve the anticipated benefits of the prior and any future acquisitions or to successfully integrate the operations of the companies we acquire could have a material and adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. Any future acquisitions could also result in potentially dilutive issuance of equity securities, acquisition or divestiture-related write-offs or the assumption of debt and contingent liabilities. In addition, we have made and will continue to consider making strategic divestitures. With any divestiture, there are risks that future operating results could be unfavorably impacted if targeted objectives, such as cost savings, are not achieved or if other business disruptions occur as a result of the divestiture or activities related to the divestiture.

 

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We are subject to risks of non-compliance with environmental and other governmental regulations.

We are subject to a variety of governmental regulations relating to the use, storage, discharge, handling, emission, generation, manufacture, treatment and disposal of toxic or otherwise hazardous substances, chemicals, materials or waste. If we fail to comply with current or future regulations, such failure could result in suspension of our operations, alteration of our manufacturing process, remediation costs or substantial civil penalties or criminal fines against us or our officers, directors or employees. Additionally, these regulations could require us to acquire expensive remediation or abatement equipment or to incur substantial expenses to comply with them.

We are also subject to a variety of other governmental regulations and may incur significant costs associated with the compliance with these regulations. For example rules adopted by the SEC to implement the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act impose diligence and disclosure requirements regarding the use of “conflict” minerals mined from the Democratic Republic of Congo and adjoining countries in the products we manufacture. Compliance with these regulations is likely to result in additional costs and expenses or may affect the sourcing and availability of the components used in the products we manufacture.

Business interruptions could adversely affect our operations.

Our operations are vulnerable to interruption by fire, earthquake, floods or other natural disaster, quarantines or other disruptions associated with infectious diseases, national catastrophe, terrorist activities, war, disruptions in our computing and communications infrastructure due to power loss, telecommunications failure, human error, physical or electronic security breaches and computer viruses, and other events beyond our control. We do not have a detailed disaster recovery plan. Despite our implementation of network security measures, our tools and servers may be vulnerable to computer viruses, break-ins and similar disruptions from unauthorized tampering with our computer systems and tools located at customer sites. Political instability could cause us to incur increased costs in transportation, make such transportation unreliable, increase our insurance costs or cause international currency markets to fluctuate. All these unforeseen disruptions and instabilities could have the same effects on our suppliers and their ability to timely deliver their products. In addition, we do not carry sufficient business interruption insurance to compensate us for all losses that may occur, and any losses or damages incurred by us could have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations. For example, we self-insure earthquake risks because we believe this is the prudent financial decision based on the high cost of the limited coverage available in the earthquake insurance market. An earthquake could significantly disrupt our operations, most of which are conducted in California. It could also significantly delay our research and engineering effort on new products, most of which is also conducted in California. We take steps to minimize the damage that would be caused by business interruptions, but there is no certainty that our efforts will prove successful.

We could be negatively affected as a result of a proxy contest and the actions of activist stockholders.

A proxy contest with respect to election of our directors, or other activist stockholder activities, could adversely affect our business because: (i) responding to a proxy contest and other actions by activist stockholders can be costly and time-consuming, disruptive to our operations and divert the attention of management and our employees; (ii) perceived uncertainties as to our future direction caused by activist activities may result in the loss of potential business opportunities, and may make it more difficult to attract and retain qualified personnel and business partners; and (iii) if individuals are elected to our Board of Directors with a specific agenda, it may adversely affect our ability to effectively and timely implement our strategic plans.

We are required to evaluate our internal control over financial reporting under Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, and any adverse results from such evaluation could result in a loss of investor confidence in our financial reports and have an adverse effect on our stock price.

Pursuant to Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, our management must perform evaluations of our internal control over financial reporting. Beginning in 2004, our Form 10-K has included a report by management of their assessment of the adequacy of such internal control. Additionally, our independent registered public accounting firm must publicly attest to the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting.

 

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We have completed the evaluation of our internal controls over financial reporting as required by Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. Although our assessment, testing, and evaluation resulted in our conclusion that as of January 3, 2015, our internal controls over financial reporting were effective, we cannot predict the outcome of our testing in future periods. Ongoing compliance with this requirement is complex, costly and time-consuming. If Intevac fails to maintain effective internal control over financial reporting; our management does not timely assess the adequacy of such internal control; or our independent registered public accounting firm does not deliver an unqualified opinion as to the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting, then we could be subject to restatement of previously reported financial results, regulatory sanctions and a decline in the public’s perception of Intevac, which could have a material and adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Item 2. Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds

The following table provides information as of April 4, 2015 with respect to the shares of common stock repurchased by Intevac during the first quarter of fiscal 2015.

 

     Total
Number of

Shares
Purchased
     Average
Price Paid
per Share
     Aggregate
Price Paid
     Total
Number of

Shares
Purchased
as Part of
Publicly

Announced
Program*
     Maximum
Dollar
Value of
Shares
That May
Yet be
Purchased
Under
the Program*
 
     (in thousands, except per share data)  

January 4, 2015 to January 31, 2015

     101       $ 6.77       $ 684         —         $ 19,326   

February 1, 2015 to February 28, 2015

     121       $ 6.88       $ 837         —         $ 18,489   

March 1, 2015 to April 4, 2015

     222       $ 6.58       $ 1,466         —         $ 17,023   

 

* On November 21, 2013, the Board of Directors approved a stock repurchase program authorizing up to $30.0 million in repurchases.

 

Item 3. Defaults upon Senior Securities

None.

 

Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures

Not applicable.

 

Item 5. Other Information

None.

 

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Item 6. Exhibits

The following exhibits are filed herewith:

 

Exhibit

Number

   Description
10.1    The Registrant’s 2003 Employee Stock Purchase Plan, as amended (1) +
31.1    Certification of President and Chief Executive Officer Pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
31.2    Certification of Executive Vice President, Finance and Administration, Chief Financial Officer, Treasurer and Secretary Pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
32.1    Certifications Pursuant to U.S.C. 1350 Adopted Pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
101.INS    XBRL Instance Document
101.SCH    XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema
101.CAL    XBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation Linkbase Document
101.DEF    XBRL Taxonomy Extension Definition Linkbase Document
101.LAB    XBRL Taxonomy Extension Label Linkbase Document
101.PRE    XBRL Taxonomy Extension Presentation Linkbase Document

 

(1) Previously filed as an exhibit to the Company’s Definitive Proxy Statement filed April 30, 2015.
+ Management compensatory plan or arrangement required to be filed as an exhibit.

 

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SIGNATURES

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned thereunto duly authorized.

 

INTEVAC, INC.

Date: May 5, 2015

By:    

/s/ WENDELL T. BLONIGAN

Wendell T. Blonigan
President, Chief Executive Officer and Director
(Principal Executive Officer)
By:    

/s/ JAMES MONIZ

Date: May 5, 2015

James Moniz
Executive Vice President, Finance and Administration,
Chief Financial Officer, Treasurer and Secretary
(Principal Financial and Accounting Officer)

 

40

Exhibit 31.1

I, Wendell Blonigan certify that:

 

1. I have reviewed this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q of Intevac, Inc.;

 

2. Based on my knowledge, this report does not contain any untrue statement of a material fact or omit to state a material fact necessary to make the statements made, in light of the circumstances under which such statements were made, not misleading with respect to the period covered by this report;

 

3. Based on my knowledge, the financial statements, and other financial information included in this report, fairly present in all material respects the financial condition, results of operations and cash flows of the registrant as of, and for, the periods presented in this report;

 

4. The registrant’s other certifying officer(s) and I are responsible for establishing and maintaining disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e)) and internal control over financial reporting (as defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f)) for the registrant and have:

(a) Designed such disclosure controls and procedures, or caused such disclosure controls and procedures to be designed under our supervision, to ensure that material information relating to the registrant, including its consolidated subsidiaries, is made known to us by others within those entities, particularly during the period in which this report is being prepared;

(b) Designed such internal control over financial reporting, or caused such internal control over financial reporting to be designed under our supervision, to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles;

(c) Evaluated the effectiveness of the registrant’s disclosure controls and procedures and presented in this report our conclusions about the effectiveness of the disclosure controls and procedures, as of the end of the period covered by this report based on such evaluation; and

(d) Disclosed in this report any change in the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting that occurred during the registrant’s most recent fiscal quarter (the registrant’s fourth fiscal quarter in the case of an annual report) that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting; and

 

5. The registrant’s other certifying officer(s) and I have disclosed, based on our most recent evaluation of internal control over financial reporting, to the registrant’s auditors and the audit committee of the registrant’s board of directors (or persons performing the equivalent functions):

(a) All significant deficiencies and material weaknesses in the design or operation of internal control over financial reporting which are reasonably likely to adversely affect the registrant’s ability to record, process, summarize and report financial information; and

(b) Any fraud, whether or not material, that involves management or other employees who have a significant role in the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting.

Date: May 5, 2015

 

/s/ WENDELL T. BLONIGAN

Wendell T. Blonigan
President, Chief Executive Officer and Director

Exhibit 31.2

I, James Moniz certify that:

 

1. I have reviewed this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q of Intevac, Inc.;

 

2. Based on my knowledge, this report does not contain any untrue statement of a material fact or omit to state a material fact necessary to make the statements made, in light of the circumstances under which such statements were made, not misleading with respect to the period covered by this report;

 

3. Based on my knowledge, the financial statements, and other financial information included in this report, fairly present in all material respects the financial condition, results of operations and cash flows of the registrant as of, and for, the periods presented in this report;

 

4. The registrant’s other certifying officer(s) and I are responsible for establishing and maintaining disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e)) and internal control over financial reporting (as defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f)) for the registrant and have:

(a) Designed such disclosure controls and procedures, or caused such disclosure controls and procedures to be designed under our supervision, to ensure that material information relating to the registrant, including its consolidated subsidiaries, is made known to us by others within those entities, particularly during the period in which this report is being prepared;

(b) Designed such internal control over financial reporting, or caused such internal control over financial reporting to be designed under our supervision, to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles;

(c) Evaluated the effectiveness of the registrant’s disclosure controls and procedures and presented in this report our conclusions about the effectiveness of the disclosure controls and procedures, as of the end of the period covered by this report based on such evaluation; and

(d) Disclosed in this report any change in the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting that occurred during the registrant’s most recent fiscal quarter (the registrant’s fourth fiscal quarter in the case of an annual report) that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting; and

 

5. The registrant’s other certifying officer(s) and I have disclosed, based on our most recent evaluation of internal control over financial reporting, to the registrant’s auditors and the audit committee of the registrant’s board of directors (or persons performing the equivalent functions):

(a) All significant deficiencies and material weaknesses in the design or operation of internal control over financial reporting which are reasonably likely to adversely affect the registrant’s ability to record, process, summarize and report financial information; and

(b) Any fraud, whether or not material, that involves management or other employees who have a significant role in the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting.

Date: May 5, 2015

 

/s/ JAMES MONIZ

James Moniz
Executive Vice President, Finance and Administration,
Chief Financial Officer, Treasurer and Secretary

Exhibit 32.1

CERTIFICATION OF CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER AND CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

PURSUANT TO

18 U.S.C. SECTION 1350,

AS ADOPTED PURSUANT TO

SECTION 906 OF THE SARBANES-OXLEY ACT OF 2002

I, Wendell Blonigan, certify, pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, that the Quarterly Report of Intevac, Inc. on Form 10-Q for the quarterly period ended April 4, 2015 fully complies with the requirements of Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and that information contained in such Form 10-Q fairly presents in all material respects the financial condition and results of operations of Intevac, Inc.

Date: May 5, 2015

 

/s/ WENDELL T. BLONIGAN

Wendell T. Blonigan
President, Chief Executive Officer and Director

I, James Moniz, certify, pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, that the Quarterly Report of Intevac, Inc. on Form 10-Q for the quarterly period ended April 4, 2015 fully complies with the requirements of Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and that information contained in such Form 10-Q fairly presents in all material respects the financial condition and results of operations of Intevac, Inc.

Date: May 5, 2015

 

/s/ JAMES MONIZ

James Moniz
Executive Vice President, Finance and Administration,
Chief Financial Officer, Treasurer and Secretary

A signed original of this written statement required by Section 906 has been provided to Intevac, Inc. and will be retained by Intevac, Inc. and furnished to the Securities and Exchange Commission or its staff upon request.